Nouvelles directions?

In this second post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Charlotte Faucher (doctoral student, Queen Mary) reflects in French on some of the themes of the day.   Il y avait comme un air de rentrée, le 25 septembre dernier, à l’Institute of Historical […]

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New Directions in French History?

Where is modern French history going? This was the question we put to speakers at a one-day conference at the Institute of Historical Research in September. Over the next few months, we will be uploading regular posts from the participants, and responses from commentators. These posts, like the conference itself, address the big question of […]

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French History @ IHR: Colin Jones on Robespierre

Date & Place: Monday 19 October, in the Athlone Room, Senate House. Joint session between European History 1500-1800 with Modern French Seminar. Speakers: Colin Jones (QMUL) Paper Title: `What did Robespierre really want? Thoughts on 9 Thermidor’ Chair: Julian Swann (Birkbeck) ‘What did Robespierre really want?’ In this question we are faced with the quandary of how exactly to […]

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Drinking Through Lille

Harry Stopes (doctoral candidate, UCL) reflects on his favourite drinking spot in Lille, where he conducted much archival research – and he also reflects on how he became emotionally entangled with the city itself. To what extent do/should historians get emotionally involved in their subjects of study? — I was convinced of the appropriateness of comparing Lille and Manchester […]

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Issue Alert: The Tocqueville Review special issue, 36.1 (2015)

This FHN post alerts you to the latest Tocqueville Review/La Revue Tocqueville special issue, “Beyond Stateless Democracy”, which is now available on Project MUSE. — To date, despite an expanding body of empirical, historical, and theoretical scholarship on the state, we remain surprisingly (and somewhat inexplicably) prisoner to three modes of state thinking: a) the liberal vision of […]

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French History @ IHR: Roundtable discussion of Emile Chabal’s ‘A Divided Republic: Nation, State and Citizenship in Contemporary France’

Date & Place: Monday 5 October, at the IHR, London. Speakers: Emile Chabal (Edinburgh) with responses from Julian Jackson (QMUL), James McDougall (Oxford), Claire Eldridge (University of Leeds) and David Priestland (Oxford) Paper Title: A roundtable discussion of Emile Chabal’s ‘A Divided Republic: Nation, State and Citizenship in Contemporary France’ Chair: Iain Stewart (QMUL)   Click HERE to listen to an […]

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French Historians under the spotlight: Prof. Debra Kelly

Welcome to ‘under the spotlight’, a monthly interview series which offers a snapshot from academics’ lives: their passions, interests and reading suggestions – all summarised in less than ten minutes. You can catch up with previous posts here. Going under the spotlight this month is Professor Debra Kelly, Professor of French and Francophone Literary and […]

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