Category: Thinking about Research

Present Concerns, Thinking about Research

Brexit, 1905?

Guest post by Robert D. Priest (Royal Holloway, University of London) At first sight, few events seem less similar than Britain’s announcement of its departure from the European Union in March 2017 and the French state’s separation from the Catholic Church in December 1905. For a start, separation was a movement of the radical left while …

Teaching, Thinking about Research

An appreciation of Lacombe, Lucien by Geoffrey Levett

Two things prompted me to write this post in appreciation of Louis Malle’s Lacombe, Lucien. The first was a mundane training exercise for a new teaching job. The other was a two page spread in Le Monde discussing Olivier Roy’s new book on jihadism, Le Djihad et la Mort.[1] Roy’s book arrives at an opportune …

Thinking about Research

A Transnational Approach to European Resistance, 1936-48 (Robert Gildea)

Academics are under publication pressure from at least two sources (i) to write high-quality articles and monographs for the REF; and (ii) to secure external funding for big projects, preferably with overheads. Instinctively, we probably prefer the first, and when I was asked nearly ten years ago by former 1968 activist Alain Geismar why I …

Thinking about Research

Blood and Wine: The Gun Fight at Montredon 40 Years on

On 4 March 1976 at Montredon-des-Corbières, close to Narbonne, winegrower Emile Pouytès and CRS officer Commander Joel Le Goff were shot and killed, during the course of a demonstration which turned into a violent stand-off. Another 17 people were hospitalised with injuries from the disastrous fire-fight. The confluence of blood and wine drew a significant …

Teaching, Thinking about Research, Voices of ECRs

Voices of Early Career Researchers: David Lees

Welcome back to ‘Voices of Early Career Researchers’, a monthly feature on the French History Network blog. Each month we’ll post a short interview with an Early Career Researcher of French History, giving you an insight of the different paths that ECRs are following after their PhDs in and outside of academia: what do the …

Thinking about Research

Drinking Through Lille

Harry Stopes (doctoral candidate, UCL) reflects on his favourite drinking spot in Lille, where he conducted much archival research – and he also reflects on how he became emotionally entangled with the city itself. To what extent do/should historians get emotionally involved in their subjects of study? — I was convinced of the appropriateness of comparing Lille and Manchester …

Teaching, Thinking about Research, Voices of ECRs

Voices of Early Career Researchers: Célia Keren

Welcome to ‘Voices of Early Career Researchers’, a monthly feature on the French History Network blog. Each month we’ll post a short interview with an Early Career Researcher (ECR) of French History, giving you an insight of the different paths that ECRs are following after their PhDs in and outside of academia: what do the …

Thinking about Research

The second project or: How I secretly dream of being a historian of Britain

by Valerie Deacon (NYU). Stepping from the PhD to post-doctoral status can be daunting: there are innumerable job applications, the viva might still be looming ahead or you are having sleepless nights over how you can turn your thesis into a book. But there is also another hurdle: the second project. How do you start a …

Thinking about Research

Resistance: a genre of history, by Professor Rod Kedward

Professor Rod Kedward has made his mark on French history, and it is with great pleasure that we can post a piece about his latest projects and passions: the resistance. Rod Kedward has written extensively about the resistance in France, and he has been heavily involved in setting up a centre for Resistance Studies at the …

Thinking about Research

Scribblers United: The Unexpected Joys of Doodling

by Andrew Smith (UCL) — As a contemporary historian, I don’t see many illuminated manuscripts. I don’t see many handwritten sources either, if I’m honest. Much of what I end up looking at is in the tidy, typewritten order of the 1940s and beyond. One of the most unexpected joys, therefore, is discovering the marginalia …