Youth Culture at the Liberation: Résistantes and Résistants in Cardboard Cut-Outs

In the final post for this year in our ongoing series ‘New Directions in French History’, Emily Hooke (University of Southhampton) explores cardboard cutouts depicting the Liberation. On a trip to Paris a few years ago, I was wandering along the Seine, glancing casually at the boquinistes when I spotted something interesting: three pieces of cardboard illustrated […]

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Strategy or Sincerity? Studying Letters of French Jews to the Vichy Government

In the second of three new posts in our ongoing series ‘New Directions in French History’, Florence Largillière (Queen Mary) explores the letters French Jews wrote to the Vichy government during the Second World War, asking ‘how should historians look at these letters, since they give a convenient version of the reality, and hide many sides of […]

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Where is French history going?

In the final blog post in a series on the ‘New Directions in French History’ conference held at the Institute of Historical Research in September, Ludivine Broch reflects on how students and researchers approach French history today.   In Aug-Sept 2010, as I frantically tried to finish my thesis for submission, I was also designing […]

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About Time

In this seventh post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Alex Paulin-Booth (Oxford) asks what an attention to time can tell historians of radical political movements. Few people would argue that time lies at the heart of much of what we do — the blunt fact of […]

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A transnational perspective on cultural diplomacy

In this fifth post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Charlotte Faucher (doctoral candidate, Queen Mary) explores ideas about ‘flows’ between countries in Europe, raising issues around ‘transnational’ and ‘comparative’ history writing.   My work relies on theories of transnationalism, cultural transfers and, to a lesser extent, comparative history. […]

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Intimate relationships: historians, the past, and their subjects

In this fourth post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Laura O’Brien (Lecturer, Northumbria University) addresses questions of how historians relate to their subjects.   I’m sure that my colleagues and students are bored to tears with my tendency of late to preface conversation with: ‘I was at […]

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Can post-war French historians be subjects of history?

In this third post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Ellen Crabtree (PhD candidate in French, Newcastle University) reflects on post-war historians as a generation, and as individuals. In his essay What is history? EH Carr famously cautioned students to ‘study the historian before you begin […]

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Rethinking the ‘French Liberal Revival’

In this second post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September Dr. Iain Stewart (UCL), explores the significance of the French liberal revival.   On 17 October 1983 the French philosopher, sociologist and political commentator Raymond Aron collapsed and died as he was leaving a Parisian […]

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Nouvelles directions?

In this second post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Charlotte Faucher (doctoral student, Queen Mary) reflects in French on some of the themes of the day.   Il y avait comme un air de rentrée, le 25 septembre dernier, à l’Institute of Historical […]

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