Category: Present Concerns

Present Concerns

Calais is Our Berlin Wall. A Personal View by Daniel A. Gordon

Following the Conference on the Channel Tunnel (Borders and Migration) held at Brunel University London on 12 October, we are publishing this extended post by Daniel Gordon on the situation in Calais.  Daniel Gordon is Senior Lecturer in European History at Edge Hill University, and the views expressed here are his own.   It was …

Present Concerns

Boris Sarkozy and Nigel Le Pen: the Europe of our Nightmares?

Daniel Gordon, from Edge Hill University, thinks about the upcoming EU referendum… Brexit or no Brexit? and what is happening to Europe? *** On the eve of the UK’s EU referendum there’s a comparison from recent French history going round and round in my head that I think might shed some light on where we …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

Rethinking Democracy: The Tocqueville Review special issue (2015)

This FHN post alerts you to the latest Tocqueville Review/La Revue Tocqueville special issue, “Beyond Stateless Democracy”, which is now available on Project MUSE. — To date, despite an expanding body of empirical, historical, and theoretical scholarship on the state, we remain surprisingly (and somewhat inexplicably) prisoner to three modes of state thinking: a) the liberal vision of …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of June 1940, University of Sussex Journal of Contemporary History

  We love to hear about exciting postgraduate projects, and the doctoral students at the University of Sussex have recently devoted a special issue of their journal – University of Sussex Journal of Contemporary History – to a micro-history of the French defeat in June 1940. Sally Palmer, a postgraduate student from the University of Sussex working on the …

Present Concerns

The Charlie Hebdo Attack and Its Aftermath

By Dr Chris Millington (University of Swansea) In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo attack, leaders around the world condemned the actions of the terrorists. The outrage committed against the cartoonists and journalists of the satirical magazine was framed as a strike at the heart of French democracy and the right to freedom of speech. …

Present Concerns

A History of Violence: Understanding Narratives of Terror

by Dr Andrew W.M. Smith (UCL)   The violence which marred French streets last week cannot be understood without historical context. Its very horror lies in its spontaneity, in its mundane settings, and in the obscurity of its perpetrators. The shootings that occurred in Paris were not counter-hegemonic violence. They were not coherent political messages. …