Category: Present Concerns

New Directions in Research and Methodology, Present Concerns

Historians and the ‘future': remarks on the direction of French history

Will Pooley (Bristol) thinks about the future of French History in light of Brexit and Trump, but also Macron and Corbynmania. — At the event in January, I broke the cardinal rule of the historian: I talked about the future. What was I thinking? I suppose the idea of ‘New Directions’ did seem to imply …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

Europe: A history of migration (repost)

We will be re-posting the reports from the conference A DATE WITH HISTORY: DID YOU SAY EUROPE? over the next few weeks. The reports were originally published on the French embassy website. Read the fourth and final report by Megan Crane and Alastair Brunton below: EUROPE: A HISTORY OF MIGRATION. The fourth and final session of the day began with …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

Perspectives on Franco-British Relations (repost)

We will be re-posting the reports from the conference A DATE WITH HISTORY: DID YOU SAY EUROPE? over the next few weeks. The reports were originally published on the French embassy website. Read the third report by Nigel Ritchie and Katherine Barrowman below: PERSPECTIVES ON FRANCO-BRITISH RELATIONS. Renaud Morieux (Cambridge) discussed the notion of ‘foreigners’ in eighteenth century Britain and …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

What is Europe? (repost)

We will be re-posting the reports from the conference A DATE WITH HISTORY: DID YOU SAY EUROPE? over the next few weeks. The reports were originally published on the French embassy website. Read the second report by Matthew Brown and Howard Chae below: WHAT IS EUROPE? On 9th June, leading historians from France and the UK were invited by the …

Conferences, Workshops and Events (CFPs, Reports, Announcements and anything else), Present Concerns

Did You Say Europe? Opening Talks feat. Roger Chartier and Chris Clark (repost)

‘On the 9th June, the French Embassy and the Institut français du Royaume-Uni launched an exciting new collaboration with York Festival of Ideas – “A Date with History”. Bringing together leading historians from France and the UK, A Date with History, this first edition addressed historical perspectives on Europe. Seven selected UK students attended this …

French History @ the IHR, Present Concerns

French History @ IHR: A Discussion of the French Presidential Election

Date & Place: Monday 15 May, Wolfson Room, IHR, London Speakers: Sue Collard (University of Sussex); Sonia Delesalle-Stoper (UK Correspondant for Liberation); Mayanthi Fernando (University of California, Santa Cruz); Sudhir Hazareesingh (University of Oxford); Imen Neffati (University of Sheffield) Session chaired by Daniel Lee (University of Sheffield. Roundtable Topic: A Discussion of the French Presidential Elections Click HERE to …

Present Concerns

Polls opening, polls closing: Changes and Continuities in La Presidentielle 2017

Dr Andrew Smith (UCL) is a regular guest commentator on Sky News to discuss the French presidential race. On the eve-eve of the first round, he gives one final look at the situation, outlining the trajectories and hurdles of the key candidates whilst also questioning how ‘novel’ their projects really are. There have been a lot of polls lately. Polls for …

Present Concerns, Writing and Publishing

Adapting Marivaux’s L’Ile des Esclaves in 2017

A guest post by Dr Geoff Levett on French classical theatre, translation and adaptation. One of the things that never occurred to me until this year was that I might end up adapting a play by Marivaux for the stage. Marivaux’s L’Ile des Esclaves is a one-act play first performed by the Comédiens Italiens in 1725. It …

Present Concerns, Thinking about Research

Brexit, 1905?

Guest post by Robert D. Priest (Royal Holloway, University of London) At first sight, few events seem less similar than Britain’s announcement of its departure from the European Union in March 2017 and the French state’s separation from the Catholic Church in December 1905. For a start, separation was a movement of the radical left while …